Who is Rational? Public Reason and it’s Discontents

“Common sense,” Einstein was purported to say, “is actually nothing more than a deposit of prejudices laid down in the mind prior to the age of eighteen.” As both products and agents of society, there is so much information that we absorb from birth to adulthood, which calcifies, becoming the basis for how we end…

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Racism as a Function of the State

“Capitalism obviously doesn’t work without state power,” said N.D.B. Connolly on a Who Makes ₵ents? podcast on September of last year. “But then what is the state? That’s where race gets right, front, and center, because what you see happening through the era of post-emancipation through the South, through the period of the pre-war and…

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Property is an Institution—Not a Right

For many of capitalism’s critics, it is the political dimension of the capitalist system that is it’s most salient. In a socialist’s mind, there is no categorical distinction made between, for instance, a corporate merger that results in mass layoffs, and the police repression of the laid-off workers and activists who are demonstrating against the…

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The Greeks Just Said “No” to The Shock Doctrine

“In history,” wrote Rob Urie, “the Nazi Occupation of Greece created moral and factual debts owed to the Greek people that couldn’t be repaid in several epochs. This history includes tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of Greeks starved to death to feed the German people and their armies, and tens, if not hundreds, of…

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A Psychoanalyst Explains How Corporations Infantilize People

I have a theory that the truth is never told during the nine-to-five hours. ~Hunter Thompson Everyone who gets hired by a new employer becomes part of a small community that has it’s own set of values, which the new employee is expected to adapt herself to. Some of these values are meant to help…

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On Utopias and Birds—or Lenin vs. Dostoevsky

Lenin vs. Dostoevsky In the 1860’s, Nikolai Chernishevsky wrote the manuscript for the novel A Vital Question: What is to be Done? while sitting in prison. Published in 1864, it became to some one of the most important works of the 19th century—notably, to Vladmir Ilyich Ulyanov, better known by his pen name Lenin, who…

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How Conservatives Deal With White Guilt

In Tucker Carlson’s site The Daily Caller, back in 2012, a writer named Mark Judge wrote an op-ed, The End of My White Guilt. A few days before the article was published—the day he says his white guilt died—his bike had been stolen. The perpetrator was never caught, but because it happened in a poor…

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This Byzantinian Life

If it had been possible to build the Tower of Babel without ascending it, the work would have been permitted. ~Kafka As someone who has always had an intermediate skill with technology, I routinely find myself frustrated, clicking through search engine results with bloodshot eyes, struggling with what hours ago had already begun to feel…

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Not If You Were Last Man On Earth

I began to appreciate Will Forte during the period he was on SNL, which I hadn’t been watching much of, but nevertheless ended up catching his brilliantly unhinged appearances on the Tim & Eric Awesome Show, as sampled above. His 2010 movie MacGruber, a parody of 80’s action flicks, is a rare example of an…

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Extra Ecclesiam: Can Religion and People Be Free at the Same Time?

In the Gospel of Mark, when a group of Pharisees asked Jesus why his disciples were gathering wheat on the Sabbath—something which was evidently seen as unlawful—Jesus answered that “the Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath.” This statement is, in a nutshell, the principal contribution of Christian philosophy to the world…

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